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  • Date:12WednesdayDecember 2018

    Developmental Club Series 2018-19

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    Time
    10:00
    Title
    "Two Faces Have I"
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Elazar Zelzer
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Developmental Club
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:12WednesdayDecember 2018

    Machine Learning and Statistics Seminar

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:15
    Title
    Towards Interpretable Deep Learning for Natural Language Processing
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 1
    Lecturer
    Roy Schwartz
    University of Washington
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Despite their superb empirical performance, deep learning mo...»
    Despite their superb empirical performance, deep learning models for natural language processing (NLP) are often considered black boxes, as relatively little is known as to what accounts for their success. This lack of understanding turns model development into a slow and expensive trial-and-error process, which limits many researchers from developing state-of-the-art models. Customers of deep learning also suffer from this lack of understanding, because they are using tools that they cannot interpret. In this talk I will show that many deep learning models are much more understandable than originally thought. I will present links between several deep learning models and classical NLP models: weighted finite-state automata. As the theory behind the latter is well studied, these findings allow for the development of more interpretable and better-performing NLP models. As a case study, I will focus on convolutional neural networks (ConvNets), one of the most widely used deep models in NLP. I will show that ConvNets are mathematically equivalent to a simple, linear chain weighted finite-state automaton. By uncovering this link, I will present an extension of ConvNets that is both more robust and more interpretable than the original model. I will then present similar observations regarding six recently introduced recurrent neural network (RNN) models, demonstrating the empirical benefits of these findings to the performance of NLP systems.

    This is joint work with Hao Peng, Sam Thomson and Noah A. Smith
    Lecture
  • Date:12WednesdayDecember 2018

    Chemical and Biological Physics and The Clore Center for Biological Physics Seminar

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    Biological Tissues as Active Materials
    Location
    Gerhard M.J. Schmidt Lecture Hall
    Lecturer
    Prof. M. Cristina Marchetti
    Physics Department, University of California Santa Barbara
    Organizer
    Clore Center for Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The mechanical properties of dense tissues control many biol...»
    The mechanical properties of dense tissues control many biological processes, from wound healing to embryonic development to cancer progression. In this talk I will discuss recent theoretical work that combines developmental models with active matter physics to describe dense tissue as active materials that exhibit a jamming-unjamming transition tuned by cell shape and cell motility. Cell division and death, as well as mechanical feedback that coordinates cell migration, can modify the transition resulting in novel tissue ``materials’’ properties. These findings may have implications for cell sorting and patterning in wound healing and development.
    Lecture
  • Date:12WednesdayDecember 2018

    Life in the palace A historical, biographical and visual point of view

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    Time
    17:30 - 21:30
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Life in the palace A historical, biographical and visual point of view
    Organizer
    Yad Chaim Weizmann
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of You are cordially invited to a Lecture in the Humanities, ...»

    You are cordially invited to a Lecture in the Humanities,
    Which will be given in Hebrew

    Life in the palace
    A historical, biographical and visual point of view

    BY:

    Prof. Motti Golani, Head of the Department of Jewish History at Tel Aviv University and Ruhama Rosenberg Chair Professor for Jewish History

    Dr. Alec Mishory historian, curator, art critic and Israeli art researcher

    Wednesday, December 12, 2018
    19:30 – Gathering
    20:00 – Lecture
    The Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot


    * The lecture is open to the public * for information regarding accessibility arrangements and further details: 08-9343230
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayDecember 2018

    Joint mini-symposium

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    Time
    11:00 - 13:00
    Title
    Joel Richter will lecture on "Translational Control of Neurological Disease" Le Ma will lecture on "Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Axonal Branch Development"
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Joel Richter
    University of Massachusetts Medical School
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayDecember 2018

    From single-cell variability and correlations across lineages to the population growth

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    Time
    11:15 - 12:30
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Ariel Amir
    Harvard
    Organizer
    Faculty of Physics
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 11:00 – coffee, tea, and more...»
    11:00 – coffee, tea, and more
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Genetically identical microbial cells often display diverse ...»
    Genetically identical microbial cells often display diverse phenotypes. Stochasticity at the single-cell level contributes significantly to this phenotypic variability, and cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to regulate noise. In turn, these control mechanisms lead to correlations in various cellular traits across the lineage tree. I will present recent models we developed for understanding cellular homeostasis, with special focus on protein levels and cell size. These models allow us to characterize single-cell variability, including the emerging correlations and distributions. I will discuss the implications of stochasticity on the population growth. In contrast to the dogma, we find that variability may be detrimental to the population growth, suggesting that evolution would tend to suppress it.
    Colloquia
  • Date:13ThursdayDecember 2018

    Computer Science Seminar

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    Time
    11:30 - 12:30
    Title
    Fairness in Algorithmic Decision Making
    Location
    Wolfson Building for Biological Research
    Lecturer
    Sampath Kannan
    University of Pennsylvania
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Computer Science Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of In this talk we survey some formulations of fairness require...»
    In this talk we survey some formulations of fairness requirements for decision making under uncertainty. We then discuss results from 3 recent papers:


    Treating individuals fairly is not in conflict with long-term scientific learning goals if the population is sufficiently diverse.
    When there is a pipeline of decisions, end-to-end fairness is impossible to achieve even in a very simple model.
    Exploiting the knowledge acquired by others can unfairly advantage the free rider.


    These papers are joint work with a number of co-authors:

    Christopher Jung, Neil Lutz, Jamie Morgenstern, Aaron Roth, Bo Waggoner, Steven Wu, and Juba Ziani
    Lecture
  • Date:13ThursdayDecember 2018

    Geometric Functional Analysis and Probability Seminar

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    Time
    13:30 - 15:30
    Title
    Exponential decay of quotients of Ruelle operators
    Location
    Jacob Ziskind Building
    Room 155
    Lecturer
    Manuel Stadlbauer
    UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro
    Organizer
    Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar, Department of Mathematics
    Faculty of Mathematical Sciences Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Ruelle's operator theorem states that the Ruelle operat...»
    Ruelle's operator theorem states that the Ruelle operator $L$, which is a positive operator acting on Holder functions, is conjugated to $P R$ where $R$ is a one-dimensional projection and the norm of $R$ is smaller than 1. This decomposition, also known as spectral gap, is of interest as it allows to characterise the underlying dynamical system through, e.g., central limit theorems or continuous response to perturbations. However, the conjugation depends on the existence of a positive eigenfunction of $L$, which might not exist in more general, fibred situations due to purely functorial reasons. A possibility to circumvent this problem is to consider quotients of operators of the form $f mapsto frac{L^m(f L^n (1))}{L^{m n}(1)}.$ In fact, it is possible to provide reasonable conditions such that their dual operators contract the Wasserstein distance exponentially in $m$. The result gives rise, for example, to a law of the iterated logarithm for continued fractions with sequentially restricted entries or a topology on the set of equilibrium states for semigroups of expanding maps. This is joint work with Paulo Varandas and Xuan Zhang.
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Solution Processed Thin Films, Quantum Dots and Solar Cells: A Symposium in Honor of Prof. Gary Hodes

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    Time
    08:00 - 16:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Igor Lubomirsky
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces , The Helen and Martin Kimmel Center for Nanoscale Science , The Dimitris N. Chorafas Institute for Scientific Exchange
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Sela Symposium 2018

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    Time
    09:00 - 12:00
    Title
    B cell and Antibody biology – from basics to therapy
    Location
    Nella and Leon Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Michel Nussenzweig and Prof. Jeffrey V. Ravetch
    Organizer
    Department of Immunology
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Weizmann – Princeton – CNRS – HIT Plasma Workshop

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    Time
    09:45 - 17:00
    Location
    Weissman Aquarium
    Lecturer
    TBA
    TBA
    Organizer
    Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
    Plasma Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 09:45 - 10:15 Morning coffee. 10:15 – 12:45 Discussions on...»
    09:45 - 10:15 Morning coffee.
    10:15 – 12:45 Discussions on previous communications
    12:45 - 14:30 Lunch break
    14:30 - 15:45 Discussions on previous communications
    15:45 - 16:00 Afternoon coffee break.
    16:00 - 17:15 Discussions on previous communications
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Assembly of Supported Lipid Bilayers and the Effect of Nano-Patterns

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    Time
    11:00 - 12:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Dr. Yair Kaufman
    Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Soft Matter and Biomaterials
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about The complexity that drives the diverse functionalities of bi...»
    The complexity that drives the diverse functionalities of biological membranes have been inspiring countless studies for several decades. A bottom-up approach to shed light on the functionalities of the biological membrane is to study simplified biomimetic models, such as a lipid bilayer that consists of limited number of different lipids with or without membrane proteins.
    My group is studying the self-assembly mechanism of lipid bilayers with and without membrane proteins on atomically smooth or nano-patterned electrodes. During the seminar, I will discuss two case studies: (1) The effects of nano-patterns on the liquid-solid adhesion energy, which is manifested as “contact angles”. Then, I will discuss (2) the self-assembly mechanism and the thermodynamic stability of lipid bilayers on atomically smooth or patterned surfaces. Both case studies have implications on diverse applications, such as bio-sensors, cosmetics, ink industry, oil-recovery and more.

    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Molecular Genetics Departmental Seminars 2018-2019

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    Time
    13:00
    Title
    A repressor-decay timer for robust temporal patterning of Drosophila neurogenesis
    Location
    Arthur and Rochelle Belfer Building for Biomedical Research
    Botnar Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Inna Averbukh
    Organizer
    Department of Molecular Genetics
    DDP Seminar
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Economic Implications of Irrigation-Water Salinity

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Title
    SAERI - Sustainability and Energy Research Initiative
    Location
    Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, room 690C
    Lecturer
    Dr. Iddo Kan
    Department of Environmental Economics and Management and The Center for Agricultural Economics Research, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    Organizer
    Feinberg Graduate School
    Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI)
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of Host: Prof. Ron Milo Light refreshments will be served at 1...»
    Host: Prof. Ron Milo
    Light refreshments will be served at 12:40
    Location: Benoziyo Building for Biological Sciences, room 690C
    AbstractShow full text abstract about 1 ...»
    1
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Data-driven study of complex systems: from nonlinear PDEs to crumpled papers

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    Time
    13:00
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Drory Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Yohai Bar-Sinai
    Organizer
    Clore Center for Biological Physics
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Data-driven methods, and Machine-Learning in particular, bec...»
    Data-driven methods, and Machine-Learning in particular, became very popular in many diverse fields due to their unprecedented ability to identify recurring features, causal relations and complex correlation structures. For the same reasons, the application of these methods to the physical sciences has also attracted much attention, though the field is still very much in its infancy. In this talk I will discuss two applications of Machine-Learning to the study of complex systems: First, I will show how data-driven discretization of nonlinear PDEs can produce accurate low-resolution models, effectively providing a coarse-grained equation which accounts for sub-gridscale physics. Second, I will discuss crumpling of thin sheets and how Machine-Learning can be insightful in studying the emergent patterns, by augmenting the dataset with in-silico calculations of a related system - rigid origami. This also suggests a general strategy of applying data-driven methods to experimental systems where data is scarce or expensive.
    Lecture
  • Date:16SundayDecember 2018

    Remodelling of the vasculature in cardiovascular disease

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    Time
    13:00 - 14:00
    Location
    Max and Lillian Candiotty Building
    Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Andrew Baker
    Organizer
    Department of Biological Regulation
    Contact
    Lecture
  • Date:17MondayDecember 2018

    Life Science Colloquium

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    Title
    TBD
    Location
    Dolfi and Lola Ebner Auditorium
    Lecturer
    Prof. Andrew J. Pollard
    Dept. of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, UK
    Organizer
    Life Sciences
    Contact
    Colloquia
  • Date:17MondayDecember 201818TuesdayDecember 2018

    Genealogy and the Sciences

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    Time
    08:00 - 08:00
    Location
    David Lopatie Conference Centre
    Kimmel Auditorium
    Chairperson
    Daniel Hanoch Wagner
    Homepage
    Contact
    Conference
  • Date:17MondayDecember 2018

    Weizmann – Princeton – CNRS – HIT Plasma Workshop

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    Time
    09:00 - 17:45
    Location
    Edna and K.B. Weissman Building of Physical Sciences
    Amos de-Shalit Room
    Lecturer
    Dimitry Mikichuk
    magnetic field structure in a converging magnetized-plasma
    Organizer
    Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
    Plasma Seminar
    Contact
    DetailsShow full text description of 9:00 – 10:00 Tour of the laboratories – meeting at room 143 ...»
    9:00 – 10:00 Tour of the laboratories – meeting at room 143
    10:00 - 10:20 Morning coffee.
    10:20- 11:30 Dimitry Mikichuk (WIS) – “Electrode effects on the axial magnetic field structure in a converging magnetized-plasma” + Discussion 11:30 - 12:45 Jean-Marcel Rax (CNRS)– “Rotation and angular momentum absorptiondissipation in plasmas” + Discussion
    12:45 - 14:30 Lunch break
    14:30 - 15:00 Free Discussions
    15:00 – 16:15 Ian Ochs (Princeton) – “Impurity and ash transport in fusion and low-density compressing plasmas” + Discussion
    16:15 - 16:30 Afternoon coffee break.
    16:30 - 17:45 Marko Cvejic (WIS) – “Characterization of low density plasma in a magnetized plasma experiment” + Discussion
    Lecture
  • Date:17MondayDecember 2018

    Halide Exchange in Single Crystal Halide Perovskites

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    Time
    14:00 - 15:00
    Location
    Perlman Chemical Sciences Building
    Room 404
    Lecturer
    Aya Osherov
    Organizer
    Department of Materials and Interfaces
    Contact
    AbstractShow full text abstract about Halide Perovskites (HaPs) have remarkable electronic and opt...»
    Halide Perovskites (HaPs) have remarkable electronic and optical characteristics, but much is still unknown regarding the connection between their physical and chemical properties. Cation or anion substitution can change the optical absorption edge, with or without change of structure. In this work I explored the halide exchange reaction in methylammonium lead tri-halides single crystals (SCs) in order to understand the process of exchange and the stability of the product(s). I demonstrate halide exchange in mm-sized SCs, achieved by diffusion. Using the Boltzmann-Matano method and diffusion profiles obtained by electron dispersive spectroscopy it is possible to evaluate the halide diffusion coefficients, which are not constant and depend on the mixture of halides. For all permutations, the change in composition as result of the diffusion, strongly affects the optical and electrical properties and especially the band gap of the semiconducting crystals, as seen in cathodoluminescence measurements in the scanning electron microscope. While these gradients cause a lattice parameter change and may cause a symmetry change, X-ray diffraction measurements show that if the interchanged halide pair is such that their sizes are relatively similar (e.g., and , and but not and ) the resulting material remains surprisingly single crystalline. These findings are valid, no matter which one of the two halides is being exchanged. These results suggest that for these similar-sized halide pairs, this exchange occurs through a solid-state chemical reaction such that the resulting crystal orientation is determined by that of the initial crystal.
    Lecture

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